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Supporting Children through COVID-19

ResiliencebyDesign Lab featured by the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships

The ResiliencebyDesign Lab was recently featured in a blog by The Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR). CRFR was established in 2001 as a consortium research centre based at the University of Edinburgh with partners in many Universities and regions. The aims of the Centre are to;

  • Produce high quality, collaborative and inclusive research relevant to key issues in families and relationships.
  • Act as a focal point, and promote and facilitate a network, for all those with an interest in research on families and relationships.
  • Make research more accessible for use by policy makers, practitioners, research participants, academics and the wider public.
  • Enhance the infrastructure to conduct research on families and relationships (http://www.crfr.ac.uk/about/)

 RbD Lab Member Laura Wright is studying as a PhD student at the University of Edinburgh and is a member of CRFR.

Similar to the RbD Lab, CRFR develops a multi-disciplinary approach focusing on areas including childhood, family, environment, consumption, gender-based violence, and health and caring. RbD Lab Member Laura Wright is a PhD Student who is a member of CRFR at the University of Edinburgh researching the role of play-based methodologies in child researchers’ psychosocial wellbeing and meaningful participation. Laura has been engaged in attending seminars with CRFR and supporting a resilience-based seminar series. This connection allowed our organizations to learn more about one another and their recent feature highlights the work the ResiliencebyDesign Lab does.

View the feature blog here:

http://crfrblog.blogspot.com/2019/01/resiliencebydesign-research-innovation.html

Tiffany Hill Presents at ADEC Conference

Tiffany Hill, MA student in the College of Interdisciplinary Studies and Graduate Research Assistant of the ResiliencebyDesign (RbD) Lab (www.commons.royalroads.ca/resiliencebydesign), recently presented at the Association of Death Education and Counselling (ADEC) conference in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ADEC is the premiere educational, interdisciplinary meeting for professionals working in the field of death, dying, and bereavement (www.adec.org).

While Tiffany holds her roles as student and researcher when describing herself she prefers storyteller, sister, and owner of big feelings and many tattoos. These elements of her identity greatly influence her research, which she spoke about at ADEC over the April 25th weekend in her presentation titled, “Exploring Childhood Sibling Bereavement Through Arts-Based Methods.”

Supervised by Dr. Cheryl Heykoop, Tiffany’s Master’s thesis work, “An Autoethnography on Sibling Bereavement: Navigating the Complexities of Dying, Death, and Grief,” aims to explore her lived experiences of the dying and death of her brother, Theodore, and her grief in the recent six months following his death. Further, she will be reflecting on her use of creative arts-based methods to help cultivate an understanding of grief as a process to be honored rather than a problem to mitigate. This exploration will inform policies and practices to support siblings who are bereaved.

As Frankl (2006) who when describing suffering, states; “for what then matters is to bear witness to the uniquely human potential at its best, which is to transform a personal tragedy into a triumph, to turn one’s predicament into a human achievement” (p. 112). Therefore, the impetus to conduct this specific research comes form the confidence that by understanding her own grief, Tiffany may offer support and insights to those who have or will experience grief or loss in their lifetime.

Heart of the Storm

Embers

Tiffany’s journey has been greatly influenced by creative arts-based methods, as highlighted in her two paintings, done after her brother’s death, titled, “Heart of the Storm” and “Embers”. These methods have the potential to support grieving processes, which Tiffany discussed at the ADEC conference. She explains that children who have experienced the death of a sibling need support. Of the limited existing research on sibling bereavement, most is largely focused on emotional, behavioural, and social signs of grief and conducted using interviews supplemented with external observations. Tiffany has recognized these patterns and believes there may be value in identifying the limitations of generalizing or categorizing these reactions to grief. In her talk at ADEC, she discussed how creative arts-based methods have the potential to encourage children to express themselves and result in more ethical and accurate research. The talk included influences and narratives from her own experience in grief and preliminary findings of her Master’s thesis.

As Tiffany shows through her experience and research, grief is a complex journey and expressing this through art-based means can provide an important outlet. A quote that greatly influences her work captures this process well;

“Grief, I’ve learned is really just love. It’s all the love you want to give but cannot. All of that unspent love gathers up in the corners of your eyes, the lump in your throat, and in that hollow part of your chest. Grief is just love with no place to go” (Anderson, n.d.).

To learn more about Tiffany’s work or her role in the RbD Lab, visit the RbD Library Showcase located in the Royal Roads Library, running until June 8th.

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